THE ISLAND OF HERM
Auction Particulars and Contract of Sale, Tuesday 29th July 1884


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Of which about 9 acres are permanent grass, and 92½ acres arable, the soil being fine deep alluvial loam, well adapted for the growth of Fruit and the highly priced early Potatoes, Peas, Asparagus, Sea Kale, and other Vegetables which are daily during the season, so extensively exported from Guernsey and Jersey. The remainder has a picturesque broken surface with gorse and cover, and a few trees, and there are also rich feeding lands.

From the details in the Admiralty Chart, it is believed the higher portions of the island attain an altitude about 232 feet above low water level. The lands are crowned by several Cromlechs, the

OLD MILL OF HERM.

A NOTED NAUTICAL MARK,

AND THE

ANCIENT CHAPEL

before-named. At the western side of the Island, facing St. Peter's Port, there is an

EXCELLENT HARBOUR,

with a substantial Pier, repaired and improved at a large cost; the Harbour probably has a depth of about 20ft. or upwards, at high water.

At Rosiere Bay are a series of Landing Steps, in good order and accessible at all times of the tide:

Harbour Offices with two stores for boats, Piggeries, &c., adjoining; whilst elsewhere there are lofty and wild Cliffs, Gorges, romantic Pinnacles of Rock, and broken bits of Wild Bock Scenery which delight the eye of an artist, and which form the natural home of the Cormorant, Gannet, Guillamot, Curlew, Razorbill, Turnstone, Sandpiper, numerous Gulls and other sea birds.

THE CREUX,

one of the so-called "sights" of the Channel Islands, a deep funnel-shaped depression near the shore, communicating at its base with the sea by a natural archway entrance.

The world-renowned Shell Beach of Herm

AN INEXHAUSTIBLE OBJECT OF INTEREST TO CONCHOLOGISTS.

The entire property is in hand at the present time, and available with

POSSESSION ON COMPLETION OF THE PURCHASE.

 
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